Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Cast Your Own Stamps to Put Harriet Tubman on the $20 Bill

Put a new face on your money with these custom stamps. Don't worry, it's not illegal so long as you don't make the money unusable.

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Crochet Your Own Climate Change Data Visualization Blanket

Create your own blanket that reflects the rising temperatures of our planet. Despite the grim picture, the design is very artistic.

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Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Getting the Most from Dry Herbs

Learning how to use herbs in cooking from Alex of French Guy Cooking.

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Maker Faire Atlanta Celebrates the Local Fluidity Between Schools, the Community, and Business

Everyone's a maker this upcoming weekend in downtown Atlanta as the community comes together for a Weekend of Making, which includes the seventh annual Maker Faire Atlanta, October 22 at the Georgia Freight Depot.

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Cast a Pixelated, Glowing Centipede Costume for Halloween

Follow Caleb's story as he, his sons, and his wife build an LED Centipede Halloween costume that was inspired by the movie "Pixels."

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Edible Innovations: Combining Bartenders, Robots, and Lots of Fun

For years, Ben Cowden has focused on creating cocktail mixing robots and incorporating CAD and digital tools into his metalworking practice.

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Monday, 16 October 2017

Submit Your Ideas to Help Communities Devastated by Hurricanes

We want to get your ideas into the hands of people helping rebuild after hurricanes Irma and Maria

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Drag-Race Power Tools, Build Tiny Dioramas, and Hang Out with Superheroes in Houston

This year's Houston Maker Faire takes place on October 21 and 22 at the George R. Brown Convention Center, which, up until just a month ago, served as an emergency shelter and relief center for thousands of hurricane victims.

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Maker Pro News: Canary in a Coal Mine, Cubibot, and More

An IoT home security outfit makes a blunder, two makerspaces recover in the wake of disaster, and digital fabrication machines go personal.

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Math Monday: A Base Beyond

Have you ever heard of sesquinary numbers?

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Open World: Wevolver’s Cameron Norris

Wevolver helps engineers share and collaborate on projects. They primarily operate out of the makerspaces seen in our Open World series.

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Sunday, 15 October 2017

This Week in Making: Secret Prison Computers, Destiny Sparrows, and a Invisible Girl

This week, computers are found in a prison's ceiling, Destiny Sparrows are brought to life, and a cosplayer dresses up as an invisible girl.

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#IArtLibraries | Queer Book Diorama Show at NYPL’s Jefferson Market branch

This post originally appeared on the Library as Incubator Project in September 2014.

Today, Rebecca Rubenstein interviews the curators of an exciting new show at the Jefferson Market branch of the NYPL, where community-minded artists regularly show their work.  Don’t miss Rebecca’s other posts on library-as-incubator happenings in the NYC area! ~Erinn

QueerBookDioramaShow

by Rebecca Rubenstein.

I recently spoke with the curators of the Queer Book Diorama Show, Hugh Ryan and Sassafras Lowrey. The show is currently on exhibit at the Jefferson Market branch of the New York Public Library. During a panel discussion at the library, the artists talked about their creative process. By visually representing books that have deeply impacted their lives, the artists were able to learn a great deal about themselves and actually become part of their favorite stories in their own way.

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Curators Hugh Ryan and Sassafras Lowrey

RR: What inspired you to organize this show?

Sassafras: Last summer, Michelle Brennan an artist in Michigan created a “book in a box” style diorama of my novel Roving Pack. She was undergoing treatment for cancer when she read the book, and was so connected to it that she was inspired to make art about the book and then sent it to me as a gift!

Queer books are so important to many of us as we have come out though different queer identities, to see our lives/bodies/relationships represented. Opening the diorama I was struck again in a new way about the power of books, and the way they inspire us. ~Sassafras Lowrey

I immediately shared the photo of the diorama on Facebook, and was amazed at how many people commented on it. Hugh Ryan was tagged in a comment because of his work with the Pop Up Museum -the community was asking us to find a way to bring queer book dioramas to life! We were both intrigued and started throwing around ideas and before long, the show was born. Hugh and I had never worked together before, but everything fell into place really organically. It’s hard to believe we’ve been working on this for the last year, and that it has grown into such a fun expression of the power of queer literature!

Victoria Baker | Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown 

RR: What was your curation process like? How did you choose the exhibiting artists?

Hugh: We issued a call for proposals far and wide! Pop-Up has a four-year history of working with queer art makers and historians around the country, so we have a pretty robust starting list to draw from – and increasingly, we’re getting submissions from around the world (for this show, we received submissions from Ireland, Canada, The Czech Republic, and South Africa). Once we had the proposals in hand, we evaluated them on a number of criteria: How well they established a connection between their piece and the theme of the show, how well thought out their plan for the exhibit seemed, their ability to carry through on their proposal, and the overall need and look of the show itself. We talked through our thoughts on each piece, and once we had a short list of pieces we liked, we thought about what grouping of them went together to create the best show as a whole.

Michelle Morgan Chelsea Girls By Eileen Myles

Michelle Morgan | Chelsea Girls by Eileen Myles

Sassafras: I’ve edited two anthologies but have never curated an art show, so for me this was a whole different process.

Not only did artists write really thoughtful proposals, it was also palpable the ways that books had influenced their lives and contributed to the formation of their identities.  It made it hard to pick which dioramas to include in the show!

Jason Bishop & Tim McMath | Mommie Dearest by Christina Crawford

Jason Bishop & Tim McMath | Mommie Dearest by Christina Crawford

RR: I liked that the pieces ran the gamut from traditional to more contemporary takes on the diorama as a means of expression. What drew you to want explore the use of dioramas specifically as visual representations of books?

Sassafras: I was really drawn to the relateability of dioramas as a medium. Most of us remember having to make one as a book report in elementary school. I was attracted to the playfulness of revisiting the diorama as queer adults, inspired by queer books, and how it was a medium that could take many different forms. One thing I really like about how the show came together is how different all the dioramas are from each other!

Michael Moran | Dancer From the Dance by Andrew Holleran

Michael Moran | Dancer From the Dance by Andrew Holleran

Hugh: As a curator, I want to create shows that allow queer people to explore and explain our own stories to each other, and the diorama form seemed perfect for that purpose because it’s not intimidating – after all, didn’t everyone have to make a shoebox diorama at some point in the 4th grade? (Mine was on Slake’s Limbo, a book I still love to this day). And books are often one of the first places that many queer people find expression for our sexual / gender identities, so there was a natural connection that I was eager to explore.

I want to create shows that allow queer people to explore and explain our own stories to each other, and the diorama form seemed perfect for that purpose because it’s not intimidating – after all, didn’t everyone have to make a shoebox diorama at some point in the 4th grade? ~Hugh Ryan

Ketch Wehr | The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf

Ketch Wehr | The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf

RR: Where can I find out more about your work? What other arts and/or book related activities are you involved with?

Hugh: You can find out more about my work on my website, www.hughryan.org, which is mostly devoted to my journalism. I cover queer art, politics, and culture, along with social justice and literature (especially young adult lit) generally. And to find out more about Pop-Up, like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/QMuseum or check out our website at www.queermuseum.com.

Sassafras: The best place to find out about my work is at my website http://ift.tt/Y662SU and folks can friend me on Facebook/Twitter! My next novel Lost Boi which is a queer, punk, re-imagining of Peter Pan that will be released from Arsenal Pulp Press in April 2015. My other books include  Roving Pack, a novel, and two anthologies: Kicked Out, and Leather Ever After.

Jacky Flagg | Fun Home by Alison Bechdel

Jacky Flagg | Fun Home by Alison Bechdel

 

rebecca_rubensteinRebecca Rubenstein is an artist who earned her MFA from from Pratt Institute before enrolling as an MSLIS student at the Palmer School of Library and Information Science, Long Island University. She recently completed an internship with the Librarian for Fine Art at New York University’s Bobst Library. One of her projects there was to build a Lib Guide which includes online and print professional development resources for visual artists. She currently works in the eLibrary of an educational software company. Visit her website at http://ift.tt/1v3kbM1.



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Saturday, 14 October 2017

Weekend Watch: Come on Down to Al’s Hack Shack!

A brand new 'Tuber builds himself a "Hack Shack" and takes us along on the journey.

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Friday, 13 October 2017

Tips of the Week: Adding Color to Engravings, Marking Holes with Magnets, and the Value of Keeping Your Mistakes

Waterproofing with glue, coloring fine-detail engravings, heat-sealer as organizer, and more.

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California Wildfires: How Makers Can Respond When Disaster Strikes

Wildfires have ravaged Northern California all week, and makers are beginning to organize.

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Use Puck.js to Automate Your Gardening Tasks

Are you one of those people, like us, that have trouble remembering to water your tomato plants? Now you no longer have to!

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This Lemonade “Stand” Is a Giant Drivable Lemon

Video game artist Rob Adams and his son built a mobile lemonade go-kart stand in the shape of a giant lemon.

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Thursday, 12 October 2017

Design and 3D Print Your Own Gaming Miniature Bases

Design and print your own custom gaming bases while learning Tinkercad.

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Mold Your Own Edible Adam Slug From Bioshock

Learn how to create the mold that will allow you to make a gummy variation of the super powered-infused slugs found in Bioshock.

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Circus Arts, a Robot Petting Zoo, and a Fire-Breathing Dragon Meet at Maker Faire Pittsburgh

So many sights and sounds you won't want to miss!

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Build a Chair Workshops Bring Hope to Thomasville’s Maker Community

After losing a big part of their economy to Chinese manufacturers, Thomasville opened up a makerspace to recapture its citizens maker pride.

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Curious and Curiouser: Eye-Popping Exhibition Demos

by Rebecca Hopman

One of the most popular cases in the Curious and Curiouser exhibition at the Rakow Library revolves around glass eyes, and it’s easy to see why. People are fascinated by eyes – real or fake. Our case includes several eye-catching advertisements and a box with samples of glass eyes at each stage of the prosthetic-making process.

We paired several of the Rakow Library’s glass eye advertisements with a box of glass eyes at different stages of the prosthetic-making process.

We’re taking this part of the exhibition one step further by having a daily eye-making demo at the Museum. Our team of flameworkers demonstrates how to make glass eyes to our visitors, explaining the techniques and the history behind prosthetic eyes while they manipulate the hot glass. They are quick to say their examples are far from the real thing, but they look pretty realistic to me!

I spoke to one of our flameworkers, Caitlin Hyde, about the demo and its connections to the Library’s collection.

Caitlin Hyde demonstrates flameworking to Museum visitors.

Several practice eyes made by our flameworking team.

RH: Why did you choose to make glass eyes for your demonstration?

CH: Our flameworking team likes to develop a demo that relates to any special exhibit happening at the Museum or the Rakow Library. When I saw the glass eyes in the Curious & Curiouser exhibit, this seemed like a great option for us. Not only are the eyes flameworked, but they are so intriguing in historical, sociological, scientific and art contexts!

RH: How did you learn to make prosthetic eyes?

CH: The specialized technical skills used for making real artificial eyes require years of study and practice, but we have been delighted with the challenge of learning, at least enough, to show our visitors the various steps of the process.

RH: Tell me about the special glass you’re using for this demo.

CH: Glass eyes are made from a unique glass originally formulated specifically for the process in the 1800s. It works well for eye prosthetics because it is less chemically reactive with human tears, and so maintains a smooth surface longer than other types of glass.

That also means it behaves differently than other types of glass when it is being shaped in the flame. You can imagine that provides an interesting learning curve for our team. Any time you switch from one glass to another there are adjustments that need to be made in how you heat the glass, how you interact with and shape the object. So, in developing this demo we’ve had the (occasionally uncomfortable) pleasure of stepping out of our comfort zone and stretching the boundaries of our technical skills.

RH: What inspired this demo and your interest in prosthetic eyes?

CH: It was the fact of the eye samples and the glass eye advertising poster being in the Rakow Library collection, along with other interesting tidbits, like the story of a glass eye smuggler, that inspired this research project and the demo.

Advertising poster for glass eyes, Queens & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1891. CMGL 72685.

Artificial eyes: enameled eyes in assorted natural colors: price list, Demuth Brothers, New York: Demuth Brothers, 1883. CMGL 53915.

Preis-Liste über Emaille-Augen mit schwarzer Pupille (Price list for enameled eyes with black pupils), L.W. Schaufuss (Firm), Dresden: L. W. Schaufuss, 1866. CMGL 54006.

RH: How did you develop the stories you tell during the demo?

CH: We followed a trail of technical and historical investigation that unearthed a great range of fascinating details about the history of artificial eyes made of various materials, a connection between glass eyes and the town of Lauscha, Germany, (a historic glass center) as well as some pretty unique flamework techniques.

RH: How have visitors reacted to your demos?

CH: We’ve been presenting The Curious Glass Eye demo for a few weeks now and visitors are very responsive. It’s a fun and unusual demonstration and reactions range from delight and fascination to intrigue and even the occasional squirmy, “Ooh, look! It’s an eyeball!” comment.

Eric Goldschmidt, Properties of Glass Programs Supervisor at the Museum, demonstrates several steps of the prosthetic-making process.

Eric Goldschmidt, Properties of Glass Programs Supervisor at the Museum, demonstrates several steps of the prosthetic-making process.

Detail of the eye.

 

Curious? Learn more about the exhibition by reading the monthly posts published on the CMoG blog and the LAIP blog, and follow us on social media at @corningmuseum.

 

This post is shared here with permission from the CMOG and the Rakow Research Library. 

 

profilepic_hopmanRebecca Hopman is the Outreach Librarian at The Rakow Research Library of The Corning Museum of Glass. She has worked in a number of libraries and archives since 2005 and received her MLS from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2012. When she’s not at the library, you might find her embroidering, writing snail mail, or cheering on the Chicago Cubs. Follow her on tumblrextabulis.tumblr.com.



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Edible Innovations: Hacking for More Sustainable Schools

CentriSeed Innovations provides sustainable solutions to communities both local and abroad, and develop student's professional skills.

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Wednesday, 11 October 2017

3D Carving Is More Than Just a Tool, It’s a Community (and a Book)

3D carvingInventables wants to build communities that encourage creators to try 3D carving. To that end, they're making their machines more accessible.

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Making Sense of the Confusing Landscape of Embroidery Software

So you bought a new embroidery machine, but what type of software should you be using? These recommendations should help you get started.

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Learn Essential Maker Skills with Our New Interactive Workshops

Our new workshops on Maker Share will help creators get the maker skills they need to start building the stuff they want.

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15 Makerspaces, Meow Wolf, SparkFun AVC, and More at Maker Faire Denver

so much to see!

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Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Amazing Star Wars K-2SO Robot Make-Up Tutorial

Turn the head of every meatbot at the costume party with this incredible K-2SO make-up job.

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Maker Pro News: The State of Hardware Funding, Yogurt Maker Pros, and More

Even promising startups can eventually go down in flames. But why? How can aspiring maker pros avoid the pitfalls of hardware funding?

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Embark On A Mission Of Discovery To Celebrate Ada Lovelace Day

take a tiny action today, to make a big change

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Edible Innovations: Engineering a 3D Printer to Extrude Chocolate

Evan Weinstein went to World Maker Faire New York to introduce Cocoa Press, a 3D printer for chocolate that he developed all by himself.

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Get to Know the BBC Micro:bit

It's time we gave the micro:bit an in-depth look, and showcase what exactly this impressive little device is capable of doing for you.

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#IArtLibraries | Tiny Library Concerts at the Collegiate School

This post originally appeared on the Library as Incubator Project in 2012.

The Library as Incubator Project is pleased to feature Tiny Library Concerts, submitted by Allen Chamberlain, librarian at the Reed-Gumenick Library at the Collegiate School, a private K-12 school in Richmond, Virginia.  Tiny Library Concerts seems to be a prime example of how students and school librarians can work together to create creative and popular arts programming in a school environment.   Allen describes the project:  

Tiny Library Concerts was inspired by Bob Boilen’s (the NPR music critic) Tiny Desk Concerts. As you know, he invites musicians to his desk to play a set, and then they’re streamed on the NPR website. This just seemed like a perfect fit for the library during lunch on Fridays. We book student musicians and publicize the concerts with the help of an Upper School student club, MACE (Musical Association for Collaborative Effort).

Tiny Library Concert poster, designed by student Annika Wooton

How did it start? Where/what was the need, and how did this fill it?

The Tiny Library Concerts started because we have a vibrant music program here at Collegiate and a library where students love to hang out. Although we have remarkable “formal” school concerts, we thought it would be fun to begin our weekend with something more informal. Plus, we have many students who are musicians but don’t play or sing in the orchestra, jazz band, strings ensemble, or camerata. The Tiny Concert is their venue.

How was the project developed? 

After we were inspired by Bob Boilen, we started talking to students, to find out how much interest there might be. From there, it’s taken off like a rocket. We work with students in MACE, led by Co-Presidents Anthony Vita and Ian Rowland, to book musicians and to publicize the concerts.  Students from MACE also setup the space and equipment (keyboards, mics, etc.). Mike Boyd, Director of Performing Arts at the school, has also been unfailingly supportive of the project. We now have more students who want to play than we do Fridays on the calendar.

How did/do you promote it?

We promote the concerts with posters, announcements at assemblies, word-of-mouth, and through email. Our poster was designed by a student, Annika Wooton, who is a gifted graphic designer.

Describe a typical Tiny Desk Concert. 

During our first lunch period (from 11:00 to 11:40) on Friday, we turn the library over to the concert. Students and teachers bring their lunch or just bring their good selves to listen. On the morning of the concert, students from MACE bring in all the equipment. Just before the concert begins, they set up, and when it’s over, they take everything back to the performing arts building.

What have been the results? 

The concerts have been wildly successful. Although we haven’t expanded the program, we see many possibilities for the library being a performance space. To give you a sense of the concerts, see two features from our school newspaper, here and here.

What has been the response from the community?

Crazy. Wonderful.



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Monday, 9 October 2017

Understanding Dry-Aged Beef and Making Your Own Dryer

Alex, of French Guy Cooking, explores the exotic, beefy world of air-drying meat.

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Math Monday: Access to Addition

Let’s face it. There are easier ways to count a pile of marbles than to deposit them one by one into either of the machines we’ve built over the last couple of weeks. Can’t we build a machine that would do something at least slightly more useful? Like at least add two […]

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This Guy Built a Canoe from Scratch Inside His Apartment

For under $300, Joel Watson built a full-sized 16-foot canoe inside his small two bedroom apartment.

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Sunday, 8 October 2017

This Week in Making: Sword from RWBY, Paper Lamps, and Video Game Maker

This week check out a sword from RWBY get brought to life, lamps that are made entirely from paper, and a cheap way to design a game.

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#IArtLibraries: Featuring: Charles Bane

This post originally appeared on the Library as Incubator Project in June 2014.

Today I’m pleased to welcome Charles Bane, Jr. to the Library as Incubator Project. Mr. Bane is a poet whose work is influenced by literature, and for whom libraries have played an important role in the inspiration for and promotion of his poetry. Enjoy! ~ Laura

Library as Incubator Project (LAIP): Please introduce yourself; tell us who you are, and what sort of creative work you make, and how you got started making art.

Charles Bane (CB): I’m a poet living in South Florida where I’m a current nominee as Poet Laureate of our state. I have two published collections of poetry: The Chapbook (Curbside Splendor, 2011) and the newly released Love Poems (Aldrich Press, 2014). The Huffington Post described my first collection as “not only standing on the shoulders of giants, but shrinking them.” The book came to the notice of past U.S. Poet Laureate Donald Hall and we wrote one another for nearly a year, until illness forced a halt. Hall was the first Poetry Editor of The Paris Review and I donated our letters to them, where they’re archived.

I created and contribute to The Meaning Of Poetry Series for The Gutenberg Project. My recent release, Love Poems, is being entered for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize. I began writing poetry very early, which is common, I think, to determined poets.

When I phoned Richard Wilbur, a past Poet Laureate of the United States to ask him to endorse my new book, he good naturedly asked me when I was first published. I replied I was twelve. “Latecomer!”, Wilbur laughed. He was published at eight.

Cover of "Love Poems" by Charles Bane, Jr. (Aldrich Press, 2013).

Cover of “Love Poems” by Charles Bane, Jr. (Aldrich Press, 2013).

 

LAIP: What is your relationship to libraries? How have they influenced or affected your creative work?

CB: Libraries have played a profound role in my love of language and as a resource for research for The Gutenberg Project. My late father was a miner’s son who had to return from The University of Chicago to his native Springfield Illinois to support his family during the Great Depression. He scythed wheat. The local librarian contrived to find him work in the library, away from the fields. He eventually returned to the University of Chicago, won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford and finished his studies at Harvard Law School. When he later wrote a legal text, the book was dedicated to the Springfield librarian.

My new release, Love Poems, is being carried on the shelves of the Palm Beach County Library System in a pilot program to introduce Florida authors to the general public.

LAIP: What authors or titles do you turn to when you are looking for inspiration?

CB: Two books, in particular, stand out as influences on my work: Venetian Vespers by Pulitzer Prize winner Anthony Hecht, and Geography lll by Elizabeth Bishop. Bishop was a genius, and was, to me, the finest poet of the 20th century.

LAIP: As an artist, what would your “ideal” library look or be like? What would it have in it?

CB: Many Americans don’t know we are in a golden age of literary journals and small presses. There are hundreds of them, like wildflowers, and they’re publishing a new generation of gifted fiction writers and poets.

Publishing is becoming increasingly corporate and concentrated, and the popular titles they promote through the media outlets, that are often part of their own corporate powerhouses, leave little room for new literary talent to be recognized. Literary journals and, in particular, small presses can’t compete with their advertising dollars and public relations apparatus. Public libraries can play a game-changing role by seeking out the best small presses  and carrying their output on their shelves.

Read more about Charles Bane, Jr.’s poetry in the Huffington Post.  

 
For My Son, CBjr


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Friday, 6 October 2017

Tips of the Week: Magnet Clips, Hobby Knife Compass, and the Squiggly Line of Untrue

Adding magnets to your test clips, turning a compass into a circle cutter, and a cheap lamp on every desk.

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8 Blade Runner Inspired Projects to Get You From Replicant to Repli-can.

Blade Runner is my favorite movie, which you will know immediately on meeting me because I never shut up about it. Luckily for me, the new Blade Runner 2049 movie means people don’t roll their eyes as much when I talk about it lately, plus all of my maker friends […]

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Omax Introduces Personal Waterjet

Omax just announced the protoMAX, a waterjet designed for makerspaces, schools, or anyone who wants to manufacture smaller projects.

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Two Makerspaces Turn to Crowdfunding in the Wake of Disaster

Fires, floods, and other types of disasters can completely wipe out makerspaces or other local gathering spots for makers. You can help.

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Thursday, 5 October 2017

Build a Simple PantoProbe for High-Precision Electronics Troubleshooting

3D print a PantoProbe, a simple device for amplifying your probe precision in electronics testing.

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Maker Faire San Diego Celebrates the Human Experience Behind the Projects

In the past few years, we’ve seen many innovators and tinkerers start self-identifying as makers, growing the sense of community and spreading the word of the Maker Movement.

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Edible Innovations: The Coffee Cookie Keeps Your Cup Warm

Victoria Gregory and Gabe Alba designed, developed, and manufactured Coffee Cookie, a device that keeps your coffee hot for twice as long.

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DIALOGUE at the Cleveland Public Library

by Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster

commissioned by LAND studio, Cleveland, OH

Photos by: Bob Perkoski, Coryn Kempster, John Theobald

In a time of political and social disunity, Dialogue, a temporary art installation in the Cleveland Public Library’s Eastman Reading Garden, brings together both friends and strangers. With their new public artwork, artists Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster hope to spark conversation outside the boundaries of individual comfort zones.  Dialogue’s brightly colored interlaced sound tubes arranged in a circle encourage communication and moments of spontaneous interaction.

Public space has always offered opportunities to encounter strangers, and yet, individuals sharing public space usually remain unknown to each other, a situation compounded by the prevalent distraction of portable technologies. Between the current political climate and the echo chambers of our social media-driven worldviews, the need for communication is paramount and Dialogue offers a way to get it started. The 10-foot-tall and 50-foot-wide pink and red structure aims to create conversations ranging in length and seriousness. Through simple dialogue, the connection to others in public space can begin to take shape.

Besides providing a means to converse, Dialogue also offers garden visitors something to talk about. Those viewing it as an artwork may notice that, despite its role as a playful sculpture, it strikes an elegant, formal pose. The structure will prompt consideration into how it was constructed and threaded among the garden’s trees and furnishings.   

Dialogue was conceived by Jamrozik and Kempster (www.ck-jj.com), Canadian artists and designers based in Buffalo, New York. Working together in a broad range of media, they endeavor to create spaces, objects, and situations that interrupt the ordinary in a critically engaging and playful way.

Each summer, local Cleveland nonprofit LAND studio partners with the Cleveland Public Library to bring creative, innovative, and thought-provoking works of art to the library’s Eastman Reading Garden through a program named See Also. Dialogue is the eighth installation in this series. The term “see also” refers to an idea in library cataloging, which essentially means “look here, but also look for these related terms that cover similar topics.” Connecting a wide range of subjects and ideas to one another through artwork helps strengthen the Library’s dedication to providing information, programs, and materials that are interactive and engaging to the public. Using the term “see also” is a way of connecting people to the past in a forward-looking way.

See Also began in 2010 and is funded through an endowment established by the late Lockwood Thompson, a trustee of the Library and an avid art collector. The Lockwood Thompson Endowment Fund was created to improve access to contemporary art and culture for all Clevelanders. See Also was designed to engage with audiences in a new way by bringing temporary works of art to the reading garden every summer.
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Engage with Dialogue now through October in the garden, which is located at 325 Superior Avenue in downtown Cleveland. This project would not be possible without amazing partnerships. Thank you to the Cleveland Public Library, the Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, and Republic Anode Fabricators. To learn more about this and other LAND studio projects visit www.land-studio.org



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Made in Baltimore: A Look at the First Year of Operating a Makerspace

We're revisiting Open Works to see how things have fared during their first year, and take a look at Baltimore's makerspace Renaissance.

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Wednesday, 4 October 2017

13 Questions with Alessandro Ranellucci: Father of Slic3r and Content Curator of Maker Faire Rome

Italian designer, developer, speaker, professor, and curator Alessandro Ranellucci may be best known as the father of Slic3r, the most widely used open source slicing software for 3D printers, but this multifaceted maker is also an inspiring champion of the Maker Movement.

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Learn Skills the Superhero Way with Maker Comics

Looking to make stuff? Check out these comics that explain different methods of learning in order to suit your style and skill level best.

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